Tag Archives: libertarian

education, the state, and protecting children from ignorance

The other day, I started Education and the State by E.G. West. It is sometimes argued that state funded, state regulated, and state provided education is justified by the necessity of  protecting children from ignorance. So, West begins with two chapters exploring this argument philosophically and assessing how well this “protection” works in practice. These chapters […]

retroactive legitimization of regulation

This NYT article caught my eye: New York’s Cabbies Like Credit Cards? Go Figure New York’s cabbies howled when the city began forcing them to take credit cards. Some even went on strike, calling the requirements a kowtow to tourists and a burden on drivers. But two years later, the back-of-the-cab swipe has emerged as […]

is cultural libertarianism entailed by political libertarianism?

A couple of months ago, I had a debate with a libertarian friend over whether cultural libertarianism is correct/good/necessary/whatever. At the time, I was sure that I was what you would call a “cultural libertarian feminist,” as specified in the Liberal Feminism entry on the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (a reputable source). Recently, Kerry Howley […]

IHS for the win

I’ve been gone because I was here, courtesy of the IHS.  It was an amazing time; I haven’t had as much summer learning fun since Space Camp over ten years ago. The people were almost without exception both intelligent and pleasant, which is more remarkable than you might think. I am not sure whether to […]