Category Archives: biomedical ethics

Just Another C-Section Birth Story

Before I gave birth to my daughter earlier this year, I thought “birth stories” were kind of silly. Women all over the internet seemed to be routinely spilling their guts, explaining in laborious (ha ha) detail what had happened during the births of their children, the vast majority of which ended in a healthy separation […]

life, liberty, and bodily integrity: thoughts on routine infant circumcision

A while back, I shared this blog post on Twitter: the only necessary argument against routine infant circumcision Although I’ve lost track of the @replies, I recall that there was significant pushback from a couple of my followers, and so I wanted to say more about the issue. Basically the argument offered at L’Hôte is this: […]

prizes, payments, and donating blood

This old post, on the moral status of donating blood, still attracts a trickle of Google searches to this blog. I wonder who the searchers are – perhaps people trying to get motivated to donate, people trying to rationalize not donating, or biomedical ethics paper writers? Anyway, I hadn’t donated blood in over six months […]

love in the time of HIV/AIDS, for the innocent

I read this article on CNN the other day: Love in the time of HIV/AIDS . It’s about how HIV/AIDS patients are living longer lives and are increasingly able to do normal stuff like get married (even to HIV negative partners) and have biological kids (who are very often HIV negative). All this is great […]

FYI, Nancy Gibbs, society doesn't own me

I subscribe to Time magazine because two years ago they made me an offer I couldn’t refuse. However, at this point, I don’t think I would renew even if they paid me to do so. Their recession coverage has been laughable, and the opinion pieces seem ever more ridiculous. One of the latest in a […]

on the moral status of donating blood

Yesterday, I went and gave some blood. This got me thinking about the moral status of donating blood. It’s got to be either obligatory or supererogatory. You might recall these definitions from my previous post on boycotting marriage: Obligatory: If an action is morally obligatory, that means that you must do it, from the moral […]