Category Archives: applied ethics

sexism and the equality of persons

This post at Overcoming Bias caught my eye the other day: I Am Sexist Basically, Robin Hanson points out that a common definition and usage of “sexism” – having a “belief or attitude that one gender or sex is inferior to, less competent, or less valuable than the other” is flawed. It makes scientific observation […]

complications in commercializing curriculum

This NYT article piqued my curiosity: Selling Lesson Plans Online Raises Cash and Questions Basically, some teachers have made quite a bit of money by selling their lesson plans online to other teachers. Some teachers’ employers are wondering whether they should be receiving a cut of the profits, and one educational expert warns that the […]

wasting food

Even though I try really hard to buy only the groceries we need and in amounts we can use, my husband & I still end up throwing away a pretty good bit of food on a regular basis. What I can’t figure out is why throwing away food feels so much worse than letting clothes […]

more thoughts on veganism and well-being

I was thrilled to receive this thoughtful comment on my last post on my vegan experiment: Comment from abeala I have some disjointed things to say in response. First of all, yes, it can definitely be difficult to have a significant other who does not eat the same way as you. Around the time I […]

competition is as american as apple pie, except in education

Recently, I saw the above video on Facebook. Basically, it illustrates the argument that a public option in health care would compete against private insurers to the benefit of those covered under both kinds of plans. This argument seems like it is supposed to appeal to the market-minded among us, who are into competition amongst […]

why being vegan can be bad for you

I had written some notes on this topic a while back, but I lost them, so here goes nothing. You might have guessed from the topic of this post that I was going to write about why the vegan diet is not nutritionally adequate. That actually isn’t the main reason why I think being vegan […]

why I became vegan

Here’s the second in a series of posts on vegetarianism & animal welfare. If you spend any time at all in the veg*n (vegetarian and/or vegan) areas of the internet (websites, blogs, message boards), you learn the ideological territory pretty quickly. For people who recognize and take seriously the ethical problems surrounding food animal production, […]

how I semi-accidentally became vegetarian

Animal welfare issues are really important to me, but somehow they have failed to make an appearance here so far. Allow me to rectify the situation. This is part 1 of a few posts on my adventures in plant-based eating. Flash back to fall 2007. It was my first semester in graduate school. I was […]

state control of abortion: funding, or failing to provide?

I am genuinely confused by this recent Feministe post, Michele Bachmann: radical pro-choice feminist? The author offers two pieces of information that she seems to believe are contradictory. 1. A quote by Michele Bachmann: “That’s why people need to continue to go to the town halls, continue to melt the phone lines of their liberal […]

kant on queueing, or why I am not a kantian

In response to my post on how not to think about cutting in line, Jacob Levy makes these important points: I’m puzzled. This seems like the easiest of cases for a Kantian. I cannot will as a universal maxim that the cutter be allowed into line, because that would destroy the coherence of lining up. […]