Monthly Archives: May 2010

ta-da!

Well, it took me most of the weekend, but I finally have TFIR satisfactorily re-setup using WordPress.org, Laughing Squid hosting, and Soma Design’s lovely theme, The Erudite. Please do let me know if you find something that doesn’t work. Blogging will recommence shortly!

moving on up

Hi friends. This weekend, I’ll be attempting a move from WordPress.com to WordPress.org. I may be getting way in over my head, but what’s a summer without some challenging, up-all-night, independent learning opportunities? Presumably, the move will involve some site downtime, and P approaches 1.0 that I will break stuff. I also have no idea […]

what’s in a name? – labels and tracking

Yesterday, I discussed the issue of whether work-related language is appropriate for describing learning. Here’s another language in education controversy that has made it into the news lately: ‘At hope’ kids better than ‘at risk’?: Washington state lawmaker wants to banish negative labels The bill is motivated by the good-hearted desire for disadvantaged children to […]

the work of learning

Recently, Alfie Kohn tweeted an older article of his, “Students Don’t ‘Work’ — They Learn.” Sounded interesting, so I went and read it. Kohn’s main point is that work-related language  encourages thinking about education in ways that are detrimental to student learning. This work-related language pervades education discourse – “homework,” “seat work,” “get to work,” […]

changing gears

As you might know, I’m beginning a new PhD program this fall. This one is in philosophy and education, instead of just philosophy. I’ve been very interested in education for a few years now, and I know some things about it, but basically just enough to be dangerous and to write a decent admissions application. […]

plagiarism, ignorance and responsibility

Here’s the third post in a series on cheating/academic dishonesty in college (first post, second post). A year and a half ago, I taught an introduction to philosophy course independently. The lectures were in person, but the tests were online because the class only met once per week and I didn’t want to use up […]

prizes, payments, and donating blood

This old post, on the moral status of donating blood, still attracts a trickle of Google searches to this blog. I wonder who the searchers are – perhaps people trying to get motivated to donate, people trying to rationalize not donating, or biomedical ethics paper writers? Anyway, I hadn’t donated blood in over six months […]

book review: Lierre Keith's "The Vegetarian Myth"

Somewhere between my ex-vegan interview at Let Them Eat Meat, the blog Hunt.Gather.Love, and Paleohacks, it was at least once recommended to me that I read Lierre Keith’s “The Vegetarian Myth.” So, I did. The author spent 20 years as a vegan. Understandably, veganism became ever nearer and dearer to her identity, but it also […]

the wrongness of cheating

Last time, I discussed some problems with the theory that, when you cheat, “you’re only cheating yourself.” Today, I have a few things to say on the wrongness of cheating. These are by no means comprehensive or ground breaking, just some food for thought. First, I’ll backtrack just a little and say that there is […]

“you’re only cheating yourself”

As a graduate teaching assistant and course instructor, I’ve encountered cheating and plagiarism a number of times. I know that many of my friends encounter similar issues as well. So, to mark the end of this semester, I thought I’d start a mini-series of posts on the subject. First up: the “you’re only cheating yourself” […]